Supertal

December 2011

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May. 6th, 2007

Supertal

Garage Sale 2007

5:00 AM. I’m up. No, really. We’ve been waiting for this day for 8 months. I’m off to Tim’s for coffee, breakfast, and timbits for the day while my cousin walks the dogs. WHY are Tim’s cash only? Ye gods. Drive off to find an ATM.

6:00 We start emptying the house. So much stuff. Insanity.

7:00 The vultures first customers/dealers start showing up. We haven’t even finished emptying the house of everything we have to sell.

7:10 I make my first sale: I ask for $40, he offers $30, for about 500 comics. (If you want to get rid of your comics no matter the cost, a garage/yard sale is the way to do it. You won’t get any money, but you’ll get rid of them. I had maybe a half dozen guys asking about comics throughout the rest of the day. If I had known there would have been such a demand for comics I would have asked for more from that first guy.)

7:30 And we’re finally finished emptying the house. Now we have to start organizing and displaying our crap, sheesh.

8:15 Wow, there’s a lot of people. I mean, A LOT. At the moment I’m sending people to my cousin for prices for his stuff, but that’s rapidly not becoming effective, because he’s literally surrounded by people wanting prices. I start haggling for him, by proxy, keeping track of everything on a piece of paper.

8:30 I found a book I’ve decided not to sell. Weird, how placing things out for the general public can change one’s mind. I keep running out of change, despite both the change my cousin floated me, and the change I floated myself. Early in the day like this, everyone still has bills.

9:00 I can feel my face burning already. Lousy ozone layer! My cousin and I share a laugh because the event has officially begun, though we’ve been selling for over an hour, and the crowds are insane.

Teen girls love my aunt’s and grandmother’s cheap plastic jewelry. It’s our biggest draw, placed on a table at the end of the driveway my cousin and I are quick to call KnickKnack Alley.

10:00 The dogs are exhausted from all the excitement. They’re sleeping in the shade.

Someone buys a shotgun hunting bag, simply because my cousin was talking about it and it sounded ‘cool’.

11:00 SO HUNGRY.

12:30 Food ready. Not hungry. I force down a second slice of pizza because I know one slice won’t get me through the day. There is a lull where we get no people. That lasts until about 1:30 or so, and then the lunch break is over.

So many people make the same joke: How much for the dogs? Oy.

Everybody – EVERYBODY – loves the View-Master… but not enough to buy it.
The afternoon is kind of a blur of dealing and haggling, reorganizing the displays, condensing them, pulling stuff out of boxes, whatever we can do to sell the stuff.

3:00ish - swestrup and taxlady show up. Nice to see familiar faces!

4:40 – SO TIRED.

5:30 and I’m done like dinner. Made more than I was expecting but only one-tenth of what my cousin made… which is fair since he had ten times the crap I had. We’re agreed – we’re leaving everything outside, and if it gets stolen, it gets stolen. Surprisingly, almost none of our electronic stuff sold.

Feel windburnt, sunburnt, sorelegged. At least I have beer. The last sale of the day is to the delivery guy who brings us our Chinese food – a frame he buys for half the tip my cousin just gave him. Beer, Chinese food, a pocket full of cash, and West Wing season three… good times.

Part of our success lies in the fact that the whole block was behind it, with ads in the Gazette and on CJAD and nearly 30 years of history driving it. If had just been us there would have been much, much less business. In the end, I’m happy with what I made, my cousin is thrilled with what he made, and we’ve gotten rid of a bunch of stuff we didn’t want anyway.

Now we begin wading through the stuff we have leftover to sell next year.

Edit: owldaughter, you'll appreciate this. I sold my 40 year old dictionary to a girl who couldn't have been older than nine for fifty cents - she was so excited to have such a huge dictionary I almost gave it to her.

Also, people will buy ANYTHING. I sold the second (third?) season of Northern Exposure missing the third of three discs. I sold the third season of The X-Files missing the season finale on the last disc. I sold the complete series of Hellsing which I've only ever been able to get to work on one DVD player. All of these items came with a complete explanation of their faults and STILL people bought them.